Translations & Audio

My Chinese translations are written in Traditional Script instead of the official Simplified Script in use in China.  I prefer it because it was the standard script I learnt at school; I prefer it for its beauty.  There is a third reason for my choice – if no one uses it, it will die.  Not in my life time, perhaps, but as usage dwindle, as it recedes from people’s memory, when it is no longer taught and learnt or seen in print, it will be relegated to dusty shelves in museums.  To me, that would be a great tragedy.

My audio recordings are in Cantonese.  I prefer it to the official Mandarin because it is the standard language I learnt at school; it is also my mother tongue.  There is a third reason for my choice – if no one uses it, it will die.  Not in my life time, perhaps, but as usage dwindle, as it recedes from people’s memory, when it is no longer taught and learnt or spoken or heard, it will be forgotten.  To me, that would be a great tragedy.

The only way to keep a language alive is to use it, in writing, in speech, in recordings.  That’s what I’m trying to do, especially with new writing and translations of contemporary poems.

4 Responses to Translations & Audio

  1. Maemi says:

    You have beautiful perspective towards language, I hope I learn to respect it as well as you do.

    I was sent a picture of a beautiful Chinese calligraphy brush recently. Only, I don’t know what’s inscribed on it. Can you please take a look? I would very much appreciate it.
    http://www.asia.si.edu/collections/edan/object.php?q=fsg_F1980.91.2a-b

    Liked by 1 person

    • Mary Tang says:

      The two brushes have identical inscriptions; the first three characters is the Chinese translation of a name, ‘Freer’, the next two characters 先生 is a title equivalent to Mr. so the first five characters means: ( To) Mr. Freer. The two after that, 清玩 can be translated as ‘(please) enjoy’ The next three is the name of the presenter, Pang Yuanji, the last two characters means ‘a gift’. Note our grammar is different to English. The words in bracket are implied; Chinese language is economical.

      Liked by 1 person

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